Author: Robert Lunsford

Meteor Activity Outlook for 21-27 October 2017

During this period the moon will reach its first quarter phase on Friday October 27th. At this time the moon will be located 90 degrees east of the sun and will set near midnight local summer time (LST) for observers viewing from mid-northern latitudes. This weekend the waxing crescent moon will set shortly after dusk and will not interfere with meteor observing the remainder of the night.

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Meteor Activity Outlook for 14-20 October 2017

During this period the moon will reach its new phase on Thursday October 19th. At this time the moon will be located near the sun and will be invisible at night. This weekend the waning crescent moon will rise during the early morning hours but will not interfere with viewing meteors as long as you keep the moon out of your field of view. The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near 4 for those viewing from the northern hemisphere and 3 for those located south of the equator. For morning observers the estimated total hourly rates should be near 17 as seen from mid-northern latitudes and 16 from the southern tropics. The actual rates will also depend on factors such as personal light and motion perception, local weather conditions, alertness and experience in watching meteor activity. Note that the hourly rates listed below are estimates as viewed from dark sky sites away from urban light sources. Observers viewing from urban areas will see less activity as only the brighter meteors will be visible from such locations. The radiant (the area of the sky where meteors appear to shoot from) positions and rates listed below are exact for Saturday night/Sunday morning October 14/15. These positions do not change greatly day to day so the listed coordinates may be used during this entire period. Most...

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Meteor Activity Outlook for 7-13 October 2017

During this period the moon will reach its last quarter phase on Thursday October 12th. At this time the moon will be located 90 degrees west of the sun and will rise near 2300 local summer time (LST). This weekend the waning gibbous moon will rise during the late evening hours creating difficult conditions to see meteor activity the remainder of the night due to the moon’s glare.

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Meteor Activity Outlook for 23 – 29 September 2017

During this period the moon will reach its first quarter phase on Wednesday September 27th. At this time the moon will be located 90 degrees east of the sun and will set near 0100 local summer time (LST). This weekend the waxing crescent moon will set shortly after dusk, allowing meteor observers dark skies the remainder of the night. The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near 4 for those viewing from the northern hemisphere and 3 for those located south of the equator. For morning observers the estimated total hourly rates should be near 16 as seen from mid-northern latitudes and 12 from the southern tropics. The actual rates will also depend on factors such as personal light and motion perception, local weather conditions, alertness and experience in watching meteor activity. Note that the hourly rates listed below are estimates as viewed from dark sky sites away from urban light sources. Observers viewing from urban areas will see less activity as only the brighter meteors will be visible from such locations. The radiant (the area of the sky where meteors appear to shoot from) positions and rates listed below are exact for Saturday night/Sunday morning September 23/24. These positions do not change greatly day to day so the listed coordinates may be used during this entire period. Most star atlases (available at science...

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Meteor Activity Outlook for 16-22 September 2017

During this period the moon will reach its new phase on Wednesday September 20th. At this time the moon will be located near the sun and will be invisible at night. This weekend the waning crescent moon will rise just before dawn and will not pose any problems to those trying to view meteor activity.

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