Author: Paul Roggemans

eMeteorNews now listed on ADS Abstract Service

“Who writes, who remains” One of the major problems with amateur meteor work is that a lot of all observing efforts that have been done past two centuries have been lost forever because nobody bothered to publish these results or to archive publications. What we know today about amateur meteor work in the 19th and 20th century is what has been published in the past by dedicated amateurs. Long time ago meteor observing reports were systematically published in professional scientific journals such as the Monthly Notices of the RAS, the reports of the British Association for the Advancement of...

Read More

Variation in heights of CAMS meteor trajectories

The median values for the beginning heights, heights of maximum brightness and ending heights have been obtained for sporadic meteors and for meteors of the IAU established meteor shower list, based on the CAMS dataset 2010–2013. Two layers with larger numbers of events with in between a layer with significant less events were found. A seasonal variation in the geocentric velocity and ablation height for sporadic meteors has been found with maximum values for the median height around solar longitude 225° and minima around 45°. For individual shower meteors there is a significant number of showers that produce meteor...

Read More

April 22-23 2017 Lyrid observations from Sweden

By Kai Gaarder The April Lyrids are the last meteor shower of the season, that can be viewed under dark sky conditions from these northern longitudes. After 2 successful pre-maximum nights on April 18/19 and April 20/21, I crossed my fingers for clear skies the next two “maximum” nights. Unfortunately, April 21/22 was completely clouded out from my observation site in Norway, and the forecast for the coming night, was also very uncertain. I therefore decided to hit the road, and drive some 225 kilometers further east, across the border to Sweden. Outside the small town of Sunne, I found an excellent observing site on a hilltop raging over 200 meters over the surroundings. After driving the steep and winding road to the top, I observed the first Lyrid when unloading my observation gear from the car at about 20:30 UT. It was a beautiful, reddish, slow moving meteor low in the northern sky. The next half hour, I used to set up my camera equipment and take some test pictures, while waiting for dark enough skies to start my visual observations. In this period, I observed another 1 mag Lyrid in Ursa Major, followed up by an amazing yellow/green -3 Mag Lyrid, that streaked across the sky from Draco and throughout Ursa Major, leaving a smoke train for several seconds! Unfortunately, my camera field was a bit too...

Read More

Established meteor shower activity periods and orbits

The CAMS dataset of 111233 orbits collected in the period 2010-2013 has been checked to verify the online data of the IAU meteor shower list. The activity periods for all meteor streams detected in CAMS data has been derived from the solar longitudes of the individual orbits that were associated with the meteor stream. For meteor showers that were absent in the CAMS data, mainly daylight meteor streams, CMOR data has been used to complete the information. To make future associations easier and to avoid mixing up shower data, the official naming and IAU code with the orbital elements...

Read More

CAMS BeNeLux: Quarterly report 2017Q1 – January-March

The first quarter of 2017 allowed successfully collecting orbits during 65 nights on a total of 90 nights. 3823 orbits were added to the CAMS database in this period. While a fair number of clear nights appeared in January and during the last 10 days of March, the period in between was characterized by poor weather conditions. February 2017 was in particular unfavorable for any astronomy work. 1       Introduction Although the nights are long during the winter months, the number of meteors collected by any camera network is much lower in the first quarter of the year. Except for...

Read More