Author: Paul Roggemans

The Gamma Lyrids (GLY-794) did it again

Like in 2015 significant activity has been detected from the Gamma Lyrids (794) by CMOR in 2018, but thus far no orbits could be found in the CAMS BeNeLux data (until 6 February 2018) although clear sky allowed collecting a large number of orbits. Introduction A search on 2013-2016 CMOR orbits resulted in the detection of the Gamma Lyrids (GLY-794) at λʘ = 316° in 2015. No earlier evidence for this shower has been found in any year from 2002–2014 in CMOR data (Brown, 2016). A spread in vg of 2 km/s in velocity and 2.7° on the radiant position was found with an activity lasting less than 2 days. The orbit is typical for a Halley type comet but no parent body could be associated yet. On 2015 February 5, 10h–11h UT amateur radio observers reported an outburst, one of them the Belgian amateur Lucas Pellens (Steyaert, 2015). CAMS BeNeLux had 38 cameras collecting orbits in the nights of 2015 February 4-5, 5-6 and 6-7 but not any single orbit matches with the GLY-794 orbit (Roggemans, 2015).   And again in 2018 The GLY-794 appeared to be an annual shower in the radar data, but did not come forward in any orbit search on meteors in the visual range. Also 2018 data for CAMS BeNeLux revealed no orbits for this shower. The remarkable absence in the visual range stands...

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Meteor literature: Analysis of the June 2, 2016 bolide event

Roberto Gorelli mentioned an interesting recently published paper about the analyses on a bright fireball that was observed over Arizona on 2 June 2016. This analysis has been published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society by Csaba Palotai, Ramanakumar Sankar, Dwayne L. Free, J. Andreas Howell, Elena Botella and Daniel Batcheldor. The PDF can be downloaded from https://arxiv.org/pdf/1801.05072.pdf and will certainly interest many meteor amateurs. Every day fireballs are spotted and some are reported by witnesses via different media. In most cases these reports tell us nothing more than that ‘something’ appeared. Attempts to associate such reports from the public with bright meteors recorded by the CAMS BeNeLux network were very disappointing. Most reports from untrained witnesses are too inaccurate and often in contradiction with the registered camera data. Whenever a bright event drops some meteorites, recovery depends upon precise determination of the strewn field, which requires a very accurate trajectory determination which is only possible with a triangulation based on camera recordings with a precise timing. Reading the above paper may inspire perhaps more amateurs to install some meteor camera(s). Recovery of most meteorites fails due to lack of accurate data. With more cameras, amateurs can make a...

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January 2018 issue of eMeteorNews online!

The online content of November – December 2017 has been edited and archived in eMeteorNews (eMN_2018_1, January issue). Feel free to share this information on Facebook or Twitter with your group, network or society. The motto of MeteorNews is to keep it simple and easy. The website exchanges instant results, news and experience among active meteor observers accross the world. The eZine eMN serves as archive to preserve the interesting information. One advantage of online publications is that corrections can be made all the time. In case you spot some mistake, let us know and we can still correct...

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Results for the Leonid fireball 2017 November 19

By Paul Roggemans, Carl Johannink, Jean-Marie Biets, Martin Breukers, Robert Haas and Klaas Jobse 1  Introduction A brilliant Leonid fireball of magnitude -8 occurred right above the center of the CAMS BeNeLux network on 2017 November 19, 02h29m09s UT. It was captured by 7 CAMS cameras and several all-sky stations. The results obtained for this fireball are presented in this contribution. The first series of pictures and information about this fireball has been described in a previous post, see: http://meteornews.org/leonid-fireball-8-on-cams/. We add some more pictures of this impressive Leonid fireball and its persistent trail.   2  Radiant and orbit...

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Alpha Monocerotids 2017

By Paul Roggemans, Carl Johannink and Jean-Marie Biets 17 orbits of the annual component of the Alpha Monocerotids (246 AMO) were captured by CAMS networks between 21 and 24 November, 10 of them in the United Arab Emirates on 21 November between 21h to 24h UT. 1 Introduction The Alpha Monocerotids (AMO-246) are a poorly known meteor stream which must be related to a so far unknown long periodic comet. This shower caught attention because of short outbursts of activity in 1925, 1935, 1985 and 1995, the 1995 outburst being predicted and well observed by different observers in Europe. The...

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