Author: Koen Miskotte

The Southern Delta Aquariids and Capricornids observed from Crete

Figure 1. Lenikos resort at Agia Galini. View on Lybian See. Introduction Following the successful campaign in Revest du Bion during the Perseids 2016, I was looking forward to the summer of 2017. A Full Moon on August 8 meant poor conditions for the Perseids. Fortunately, this also meant that the conditions for the southern delta Aquariids and the Capricornids were good at the end of July. So I planned a vacation with my wife around the SDA and CAP maxima. With good memories of the end of July/early August 2001 (Chios Island) and 2003 (Crete) when I could successfully observe the southern summer meteor showers [1, 2 & 3] we decided to go back to Crete. Preparations I was looking for a quiet and dark location at the south coast of Crete. The north coast is not an option: there is too much light pollution due to the mass tourism present there. On the south coast there is also a great advantage that the northern wind coming from the mountains comes down and becomes very dry. We chose for the Lenikos resort. This resort got very high ratings on the different review sites. The resort is located 3 km northwest of the small town of Agia Galini at a height of more than 150 meters. From there you have a beautiful view over the (dark …) Libyan Sea....

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Perseid maximum from the Netherlands

Figure 1. Perseid fireball magnitude -6, August 13, 2017 at 00:58 UT. It is from 2012 that I had a (partly) clear Perseid maximum from Ermelo/The Netherlands. In t.eff. 3.23 hours I counted 119 PER, 2 SDA, 1 ANT, 2 KCG and 15 sporadic meteors. The all sky camera captured 3 Perseids of magnitudes -3, -4 and -6. The 4 CAMS systems captured 385 meteors during these three hours. I am satisfied with this result! Next year again from the Provence! Introduction After the successful Southern Delta Aquariid campaign from southern Crete, I hoped that I could observe the Perseids for a few nights in the Netherlands. Unfortunately, the weather, like so often, wasn’t cooperative. Only the night of 5/6 August was partly clear. Between 23:27 and 02:30 UT I observed 35 meteors. The moon disturbed the observations all night, so the limiting magnitude did not exceed 5.5. Highest hourly count of the Perseids was 8. Overall, I saw 21 Perseids (PER), 2 Southern Delta Aquariids (SDA) and 12 sporadic meteors (SPO). As mentioned, the rest of the week the Netherlands had bad weather. The night Friday to Saturday 11/12 august I was surprised by a clear sky when I came out of bed for work (at 01:30 UT). A clearing was moving from west to east over the Netherlands. I quickly started the all sky camera but after...

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The magnificent outburst of the 2016 Perseids, the analyses

Koen Miskotte (1) and Michel Vandeputte (2) 1 Dutch Meteor Society k.miskotte@upcmail.nl 2 Dutch Meteor Society and Vereniging voor Sterrenkunde michel.vandeputte@hotmail.com Enhanced Perseid activity had been predicted for 2016 as a result of a sequence of encounters with some dust trails as well as the effect of perturbations by Jupiter which made Earth crossing the main stream deeper through more dense regions. Visual observations resulted in a detailed activity profile and population index profile, the observed features in these profiles could be matched with the predicted passages through the different dust trails. The 4 Rev (1479) dust trail in particular produced a distinct peak while the 7 Rev (1079) dust trail remained rather at a somehow disappointing low level. The traditional annual Perseid maximum displayed enhanced activity due to the 12 Rev (441) dust trail. 1     Introduction Since a few years it was known that the 2016 Perseids could produce an exceptional display. Several outbursts were expected due to the presence of a number of dust trails from the parent comet 109/P Swift-Tuttle, thanks to the perturbations caused by the planet Jupiter. The very same perturbations would cause the background component (the annual activity) to produce a better than usual display as Earth would pass through the more dense parts of the meteor stream. And yes, we did not get disappointed! During the night of 11 on...

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Meteor observing in 2016: another very successful year!

Introduction Just like 2015, 2016 was an excellent year to observe meteors and there were several highlights. To recall a few: of course the impressive Perseid outburst in the night of 11-12 August 2016, a spectacular fireball of magnitude -12 on 7 August 2016 which I could observe visually and photographically (see picture above), the number of hours that I could observe which outnumbers my record number of observed hours of 1984 and my 80 000th observed meteor since 1980. All sky camera EN-98 31 fireballs were recorded between 16 March 2016 and 12 March 2017. Three of these were in the category of very bright events. On 17 March 3h16m UT a part of the trail of the famous St Patricks’ day fireball was recorded through a row of trees. A few days later, on 25 March 2016 at 23h01m UT a sporadic fireball of -8 was registered. This fireball appeared above Dutch/Belgian territory and has probably dropped some meteorites. Picture 1. March 25, 2016 23:00 UT fireball. The all-sky was active in the night of 22-23 December 2016 with a great surprise as a fireball trail was very well visible on an exposure with a completely cloudy sky. This sporadic -10 bolide may have dropped meteorites, unfortunately into the IJsselmeer (the largest lake of the Netherlands). The fireball of 28 November 2016 was a special case. At...

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Perseid observing expedition at Revest du Bion, Provence, Southern France

Figure 1. Perseid fireball of magnitude -8, captured during the second peak of the Perseid outburst of August 12, 2016 at 02:15 UT. Camera; Canon 5D. Lens: Canon EF 35 mm F 1.4 lens. Exposure time: 29 s. ISO: 1600. F 2.0. The persistent train was visually 30 seconds visible, but photographically it was visisble for 13 minutes. This report describes the observing sessions I had together with Michel Vandeputte at a small village, Revest du Bion in Southern France. The weather is in general very good in the Provence but this year we enjoyed exceptional good conditions. Thanks to the extreme clear sky with frequently a lot of Mistral wind this expedition was most successful. The Mistral wind is a very dry wind from the North which creates very clear skies and perfect observing conditions. In numbers, with 3050 observed meteors, this was the best Perseid observing expedition ever since 1986.  The total number of hours I could observe, 54.52 hours, was the highest amount of observing time since 1985. This year I travelled with the High Speed train TGV from Brussels to Marseille.  Although I travelled with this kind of trains before, it is still a great experience. You travel at about 300 km per hour to the sunny region of Southern France. From Marseille I took a local train to Manosque where the family Vandeputte picked...

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