Month: April 2017

Meteor Activity Outlook for 29 April-5 May 2017

During this period the moon reaches its first quarter phase on Tuesday May 2nd. At this time the half illuminated moon is located 90 degrees east of the sun and sets near 0200 local summer time (LST) as seen from mid-northern latitudes. This weekend the waxing crescent moon will interfere with meteor observations during the evening hours but will have set by the time midnight arrives. This will allow good meteor viewing conditions for the remainder of the night.

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April 22-23 2017 Lyrid observations from Sweden

By Kai Gaarder The April Lyrids are the last meteor shower of the season, that can be viewed under dark sky conditions from these northern longitudes. After 2 successful pre-maximum nights on April 18/19 and April 20/21, I crossed my fingers for clear skies the next two “maximum” nights. Unfortunately, April 21/22 was completely clouded out from my observation site in Norway, and the forecast for the coming night, was also very uncertain. I therefore decided to hit the road, and drive some 225 kilometers further east, across the border to Sweden. Outside the small town of Sunne, I found an excellent observing site on a hilltop raging over 200 meters over the surroundings. After driving the steep and winding road to the top, I observed the first Lyrid when unloading my observation gear from the car at about 20:30 UT. It was a beautiful, reddish, slow moving meteor low in the northern sky. The next half hour, I used to set up my camera equipment and take some test pictures, while waiting for dark enough skies to start my visual observations. In this period, I observed another 1 mag Lyrid in Ursa Major, followed up by an amazing yellow/green -3 Mag Lyrid, that streaked across the sky from Draco and throughout Ursa Major, leaving a smoke train for several seconds! Unfortunately, my camera field was a bit too...

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April 21/22, 2017 April Lyrid maximum observations from north Florida

Greetings again all,      Five members of the Ancient City Astronomy Club (ACAC), St. Augustine, Florida had a pretty good look at the 2017 April Lyrid (LYR) maximum on Friday night/Saturday morning, April 21/22, even though sky conditions were a bit hazy and cloudy off and on throughout the night.   Overall, the LYRs performed pretty much as expected with no evidence of any type of outburst noted, not at least from our area, that is.      I joined Bob and Michelle Wolski at their home on the fairway of the St. Johns Country Club and we hung in there until 0430 on Saturday morning, seeing brief spurts of good LYR activity, interspersed with long lulls of inactivity.  My best hourly count during the session was 17 LYRs between 0200 and 0300 EDT.  After 4:00 a.m. though, clouds began to come in worse so we packed it in for the morning.     Brenda and Dave Branchett also got out at their home in Deltona, Florida in the pre-dawn hours of Saturday morning and they logged 18 LYRs during their best hour’s count, which agrees well with what I was seeing from St. Augustine.  Here is everyone’s data: April 21/22, 2017 Observer: Paul Jones. Location: Cypress Lakes Subdivision, Elkton, Florida, Lat: 29.47.51 N, Long: 81.22.31 W (8 miles SW of St. Augustine, Florida) Observed for radiants: LYR: April Lyrids SLE: sigma Leonids...

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Established meteor shower activity periods and orbits

The CAMS dataset of 111233 orbits collected in the period 2010-2013 has been checked to verify the online data of the IAU meteor shower list. The activity periods for all meteor streams detected in CAMS data has been derived from the solar longitudes of the individual orbits that were associated with the meteor stream. For meteor showers that were absent in the CAMS data, mainly daylight meteor streams, CMOR data has been used to complete the information. To make future associations easier and to avoid mixing up shower data, the official naming and IAU code with the orbital elements...

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CAMS BeNeLux: Quarterly report 2017Q1 – January-March

The first quarter of 2017 allowed successfully collecting orbits during 65 nights on a total of 90 nights. 3823 orbits were added to the CAMS database in this period. While a fair number of clear nights appeared in January and during the last 10 days of March, the period in between was characterized by poor weather conditions. February 2017 was in particular unfavorable for any astronomy work. 1       Introduction Although the nights are long during the winter months, the number of meteors collected by any camera network is much lower in the first quarter of the year. Except for...

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