Month: March 2016

Exoss Citizen Science explaining double station meteor work

How to explain the basics of double station meteor work to a general public? Exoss Citizen Science has prepared a video clip that can help to explain the idea behind meteor camera networks to the public in a clear and straight forward way. The original was prepared in Spanish, here we add the English version. Both can be found on YouTube....

Read More

Fireball captured 25 March 2016 at 23h00m45s UT in Belgium, the Netherlands and by FRIPON (France)

A bright fireball was recorded by Klaas Jobse in Oostkappele, Netherlands, on 25 March 2016 at 23h00m45s UT. This fireball was also captured by 3 FRIPON stations at Lille, Arras and Cappelle la Grande in the North of France.   At this moment 37 reports have been registered with the Fireball report form. Klaas Jobse has a short video of the event online: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B2WlnrfbRicROHZUNHBEOHJ5aHc&usp=sharing More information as soon as...

Read More

Fireball over Granada on 20 March 2016

A nice presentation of a slow bolide has been put online on YouTube. This fireball has been recorded on 20 March 2016 at 22h36m UT over Granada, Spain. The video shown displays all details, a great piece of work to document this event! Read more: http://lunarmeteoritehunters.blogspot.be/2016/03/granada-fireball-meteor-20mar2016-w.html?spref=fb...

Read More

Overview of Koen Miskotte’s 2015 observing activities

2015 turned out to be a successful year after a few less lucky years and this with CAMS, the all-sky camera as well as with the visual observations. This report covers mainly the visual work. Quadrantids 2015 The year had a good start with some clear skies during the Quadrantids night of January 3-4 illuminated by the Moon. During 2.23 hours of effective observing time (limiting magnitude between 5.2 and 5.5, I counted 45 Quadrantids, 1 Anthelion and 5 sporadic meteors. Some ZHR calculations based on my own observations are listed in Table 1. Table 1 – ZHR calculation...

Read More

Meteor camera on ISS

Meteor is a new International Space Station (ISS) payload. From a window in the floor of the U.S. Destiny lab module, the Meteor experiment will use a visible-light spectrometer to capture high-resolution video of meteoroids as they enter Earth’s atmosphere. A new camera will give scientists their first space-based look at the chemical composition of meteors. The Meteor investigation takes high-resolution video and images of the atmosphere and uses a software program to search for bright spots, which can later be analyzed on the ground. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of...

Read More